U.S.A & -JAPAN ATEMI INTERNATIONAL JUJITSU FEDERTION

HEADED BY TAISHO, MENKYO GM. IRVING SOTO 10Th DEGREE BLACK BELT, COVER RED BELT

THE POWER OF ATEMI BY KIM YUSHIDO FROM JAPAN & SOKE GRANDMASTERS IRVING SOTO

THE POWER OF ATEMI BY KIM YUSHIDO FROM JAPAN & SOKE GRANDMASTERS IRVING SOTO

The art of atemi was developed in Asia more than 200 years ago, along with the science of acupuncture. The Chinese practiced the art of dim mak, or death touch. In Japan the touch of death is called atemi. Atemi focuses on striking one of the 365 points in the central nervous system. It was valued as a treasure of the masters for many centuries. The art is so deep and complex that it requires a mastery of human physiology. To this day, scientists cannot understand why a single strike to the central nervous system can kill a man.

Ancient Tradition
By tradition, practitioners were not allowed to teach atem,i only a highly skilled master within the family could teach the art of atemi. The bushido code required that a warrior must learn enlightenment and the five principles of earth, water, fire, wind, and void and that a warrior also acquire the five skills of accuracy, timing, ki or chi (internal energy), mind control, and instinct in order to become a proficient warrior.

As atemi continued to develop through the centuries, the Chinese divided the art into 81 points; each point was based on one of the five elements or principles. Atemi continued to be tested for thousands of years in remote regions of China. As the Chinese and Japanese cultures continued to evolve and intermingle, the art of atemi was passed to Japan. Soon the mystical science of mind was added to atemi and its power went to a new level. Stories began to circulate around Asia about wise masters who could kill a person without touching him; this was atemi at its highest level.
Other Systems

Atemi Jujitsu became extremely popular during the 15th century. At the same time, ninjutsu began to flourish and grew throughout Japan for the next four centuries. In the 16th century wing chun was developed by a Buddhist nun. Both wing chun and ninjutsu incorporated atemi into their systems, While other systems attempted to include elements of atemi to increase and augment their techniques' potency in judo, for example there are three major division.

The third and final division is known as atemi-waza, ate waza, or simply atemi. Jigoro Kano made atemi-waza, or vital point striking techniques, an important part of judo after learning them from gichin funakoshi; atem-waza is so deadly that it is not allowed in judo competition, and is taught only to high-ranking belts. Other examples of systems that use atemi are Tatsu Tanaka,s modernized from of jujitsu calledgoshin-jutsu part of the modernization included an emphasis on atemi-waza.Yet another form of jujitsu known as Hakko -ryu atemi strikes and touches based on the principles of koho shiatsu kenpo, too, emphasizes various methods of striking the anatomicalvital points; However, very few people gained a complete understanding of atemi, the true atemi master went underground, becoming even more stringent and selective about the students with whom they shared their knowledge.

By the 1940s, the complete art of atemi was known only by one master, Grandmaster koshimitsu Yamamoto, who had been taught by Soke Sokaku Takeda. Grandmaster yamoamoto selected ten ninth-degree black belt out of 200 student to whom he would teach the atemi art. Only one of those ten students was non- Japanese, an American named grandmaster Irving Soto who had been adopted and raised from infancy by Chinese in New York’s Chinatown. This gave him an insight into asian culture and intensive martial arts studies was possessed by very few non-Asians.

With TIME GRANDMASTR SOTO BECAME GRANDMASTER YAMAMOTO'S

best student. He became so proficient at the art of atemi that he was given the title warlord by Grandmaster koshimitsu Yamamoto gave Grandmaster Irving Soto his ancient samurai swords and his tenth degree black belt/cover red belt. When Grandmaster Yamamoto died, he left Grandmaster Irving Soto as head of the international bushido federation, the first non-Japanese,

 

TO HEAD THE ORGANIZATION.
Before his death, Grandmaster Yamamoto made one final request to his best student that he would make sure the art of Atemi lived on into the twenty-first and beyond. With the blessings of his master, Grandmaster Irving Soto opened the first dojo in New York to make this wish a reality. Soto named his system Atemi aiki juitsu which stands for the life force, also known as chi flow, that everyone possesses, chi or ki  flow is not only vital to physical health and generating power, it also permeates and enhances all facets of life, especially spirituality. The "do" stands for the way that an individual chooses to walk in life following in the footsteps of the masters such as Jigro Kano, Morihei Ueshiba, and Gogan yamamgucchi, Grandmaster Soto broke from tradition and brought the most secret and powerful art from Asia to the west. Grandmaster Soto, trained in Japan for 18 0f his 55 years in the martial arts, which emphasizes the principles of honor, respect, and discipline, and because the atemi art Soto constantly reminds his students that power and humility are interlocking forces that balances each other.

Prof Soke Grandmaster Irving Soto the founder of Atemi - ju - jujitsu waza

Atemi jujitsu waza
Japanese name

 

Kanji:

当て身
Hiragana: あてみ

In Japanese martial arts, the term  Grandmaster Irving SotoRyu  atemi Jujitsu waza  (当て身?) designates blows to the body, [1] as opposed to twisting of joints, strangleholds, holding techniques and throws. Atemi can be delivered by any part of the body to any part of the opponents body. They can be percussive or use 'soft' power. Karate is a typical martial art focusing on percussive atemi. The location of nerve and pressure points, such as might be used for certain acupressure methods, also often informs the choice of targets for atemi (see kyusho).

Some strikes against vital parts of the body can kill or incapacitate the opponent: on the solar plexus, at the temple, under the nose, in the eyes, genitals, or under the chin. Traditional Japanese martial arts (the ancestors of judo, jujutsu and aikido) do not commonly practice atemi, since they were supposed to be used on the battlefield against armoured opponents. However, there are certain exceptions.

Atemi can be complete techniques in and of themselves, but are also often used to briefly break an opponent's balance (see kuzushi) or resolve. This is the predominant usage of atemi in aikido.[2] A painful but non-fatal blow to an area such as the eyes, face, or some vulnerable part of the abdomen can open the way for a more damaging technique, such as a throw or joint lock. Even if the blow does not land, the opponent can be distracted, and may instinctively contort their body (e.g., jerking their head back from a face strike) in such a way that they lose their balance.

The development of atemi techniques arises from the evolution of the Japanese martial arts, in particular jujutsu. Early styles of jujutsu from Sengoku-era Japan were created as a means of unarmed combat for a samurai who had lost his weapons on the battlefield. The purpose of jujutsu was to disarm the opponent and use their own weapon against them. As such, strikes to the body were limited as the intended victim would have been wearing extensive body armour. However, in later styles of jujutsu from Edo-period Japan empty-handed strikes to the body became more common as full-scale military engagement began to decline. This meant that the jujutsu practitioner's opponent would not have been wearing armour and the vital points that form the crux of atemi-waza were more exposed. Thus atemi began to play a pivotal role in unarmed killing and restraining techniques.

References

  1. Soto ryu atemi jujitsu http://atemikidodojo.weebly.com
  2. Grandmaster soto http://grandmasterirvingsoto.webs.com
  3. usa & Japan atemi international jujitsu federation http://atemi12345.ning.com/
  4. usa & Japan atemi international jujitsu federation http://profsotojajjf.weebly.com/
  5. grandmaster soto http://sokegrandmastersoto.tumblr.com/

To be continued.

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Comment by SOKE GRANDMASTER IRVING SOTO on November 6, 2012 at 10:19pm

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